1871 Lwow Address Directory

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1871 Lwow Address Directory

Postby logan » Mon Nov 16, 2009 7:10 pm

A large part of this directory (http://www.sbc.katowice.pl/dlibra/docmetadata?id=8636) does not include personal names, but is nonetheless very useful for genealogists, since it contains a correspondence between older house numbers and newer street addresses. House numbers appear frequently in 19th century vital records, so some researchers have access to them and will want to determine the corresponding street addresses, a totally separate procedure from searching the directory by surname.

To determine the "new" (as of 1871) street address corresponding to an "old" Lwow house number, you should consult at least one of the sections beginning on images 6, 24, 57, 84, or 108. Each of these sections covers a different older district of Lwow, and is ordered by house number, beginning with 1 and ending in the hundreds. It will tell you the new street address and new district (one of Srodmiescie, Halickie, Krakowskie, Zolkiewskie, Lyczakowskie, but note that Lwow is today divided differently into districts). To learn who was living at that new address in 1871, consult the section beginning on image 128, which is organized alphabetically by street name.

If you do not know which of the older districts the house was in, you might need to consult all five sections. Hopefully, by looking up the corresponding residents, you can identify the correct one. However, if your house number is at least 383, then you will not need to consult all of the sections, since one of the sections ends with house number 382.

The section beginning on image 24 (old district 1) ends with house number 927. If your house number is 758 or greater, this is the only section you need to check.

The section beginning on image 57 (old district 2) ends with house number 757. If your house number is 640 or greater, you only need to check this section and district 1.

The section beginning on image 84 (old district 3) ends with house number 639. If your house number is 610 or greater, you only need to check this section and districts 1 and 2.

The section beginning on image 108 (old district 4) ends with house number 609. If your house number is 383 or higher, you only need to check this section and districts 1-3.

The section beginning on image 6 (old district Miasto) ends with house number 382. If your house number is 382 or lower, you need to check all five sections.

If you somehow know the new district, you also might be able to narrow the search with the following information: old district Miasto only has houses in new district Srodmiescie; old district 1 only has houses in new districts Srodmiescie, Halickie, Krakowskie, and Lyczakowskie; old district 2 only has houses in new districts Krakowskie and Zolkiewskie; old district 3 only has houses in new districts Srodmiescie, Zolkiewskie, and Lyczakowskie; and old district 4 only has houses in new districts Zolkiewskie and Lyczakowskie. (There is a rough correspondence between old district Miasto and Srodmiescie, old district 1 and Halickie, old district 2 and Krakowskie, old district 3 and Zolkiewskie, and old district 4 and Lyczakowskie.) So, if you know the new district, you only need to check between one and three of the old districts. However, most researchers will probably not know the new district unless they already know the street name or resident's name, which would permit a search of the section listing residents.

Old district Miasto contains all of the houses on the Rynek (house numbers 1-45). As an example of how the old house numbering is not sequential with the new numbers, consider that house numbers 1-13 correspond to Rynek 1, Rynek 2 is house number 171, Rynek 11 is house number 228, and Rynek 23 is house number 47. There are sequential sections, but you cannot generally conclude that two nearby new numbers must have two nearby old house numbers, or vice versa.

-Logan

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